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Featured Works: Week of March 12 (Growing Up)

By on Mar 12, 2017 in Featured | Comments Off

This week, Wild Violet’s contributors focus on that fuzzy, confusing time between childhood and adulthood. In her poem “Last Witness to My Childhood,” Jacqueline Jules reflect on life with a disabled sister. John Woodington’s story, “The Weightlifters,” goes back to high school to show how it’s possible to belong and be outsiders at the same time. Eve Kenneally’s poem, “Zayn Leaves...

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Zayn Leaves One Direction, Teen Girl Twitter Universe Mourns

By on Mar 12, 2017 in Featured, Poetry | Comments Off

Everything seems to happen on a Wednesday — now he is gone and I have a thousand names, a handful of universes, a hot flush behind my teeth. Mermaid cheeks, where did he go — now he is gone and I have a thousand names, videos of screaming, thinning whistled T-shirt teeth. Mermaid cheeks, where did he go — cat eyes dying into 4th period. Please get videos of screaming, thinning whistled T-shirt fusion. Vigils send...

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The Weightlifters

By on Mar 12, 2017 in Featured, Fiction, Uncategorized | Comments Off

The Northfield High weightlifting team needed bodies.  Of the original ten-man team, six had been cut, busted with fake IDs up at the Pleasureland strip club off the highway.  One guy dropped out after knocking up a sophomore, and another guy quit after getting pinned to the drop floor accordion-style under a ninety-kilo snatch without a spotter around to pull it off his neck.  Connor decided to try out for the team,...

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Last Witness to My Childhood

By on Mar 12, 2017 in Featured, Poetry | Comments Off

Sister, I wanted a seesaw: both sides taking turns, pushing the other up. But your legs were never strong enough. For years, I felt cheated, like you’d swiped my favorite teddy, hidden it inside your crooked spine. Daddy said, “No, you’re the healthy one, the lucky one. You can ride the swing by yourself. Touch the sky with your toes. She can’t, unless you help her.” Now Daddy’s gone, Momma, too, and we’re both too old...

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Featured Works: Week of Feb. 12 (Struggles of Faith)

By on Feb 12, 2017 in Issue Archives | Comments Off

When everything seems to be going wrong, how can you hold onto faith? This week’s contributors examine this issue, along with the concept of religion. In the long-awaited conclusion of “The Broken Cross” by John T. Hitchens, an adolescent boy questions his faith in the wake of neighborhood drama. The poem by Sean Lause, “The grackle as invisible priest,” uses a religious metaphor to make a nature...

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A Vegetarian Backslidden

By on Feb 12, 2017 in Fiction, Humor | Comments Off

On the seventh day God rested, so Sunday dinner was up to Lucifer. While chewing enthusiastically and explaining to his angels that, for much of the beginning of human history, his most confusing creation would believe their planet was not only flat but the center of the universe (to hearty chuckles all around) God ate in contentment. But, towards the end of the meal, the creator abruptly began to brood. Seeing his lord staring off,...

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