Fiction

For What It’s Worth

By on Nov 16, 2020 in Featured, Fiction | Comments Off

Woolworths at Cedarbrook Mall, just outside my home town of Philadelphia, didn’t look like much, but that was beside the point. Back in the Sixties, it was a great place for teenagers like me to visit during trips to the mall, especially the variety store’s record cut-out bin. Filled with carelessly tossed-in crap, near-crap, and the occasional gem, at 33 cents for a 45-rpm single, a buck for an LP, it invited those long on musical thirst and short on cash to find keys to their universe. One afternoon in 1968, I found one of mine, a rare version of Buffalo Springfield’s self-titled...

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The Bridge at Restitution

By on Nov 16, 2020 in Featured, Fiction | Comments Off

True definition is impossible – at least that’s what I’ve heard.  Each pair of eyes defines the world their own way.  To my eyes, it was about Jip and The MC (The Motley Crew).  To others, it was more about “the times.” Some people are tailor-made for the times. All I knew was Jip came to our school. and it seemed he was instantly an important piece of our puzzle; and we were a puzzle. Jip fit us perfectly: the funniest kid anyone had ever seen and a natural-born leader for natural-born followers. Our times?  It was the end of June and the end of a road for...

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A Case for Wrongful Death

By on Oct 30, 2020 in Fiction | Comments Off

Connie rocked back and forth on the faded velvet sofa in her sister Lois’s living room. It was summer, 1940. “Maybe you’re wrong,” Lois said. “I missed twice. I never missed before.” “You might just be nervous, the wedding coming and all,” Lois said. “I threw up yesterday.” “See there? Could be nerves.” Connie reached over and clutched Lois’s arm. “Tell me what to do.” Lois was a married lady, her big sister. She’d know. “Have you told George?” Connie shook her head.  Lois pulled her sister close and kissed her damp cheek. “Good. Wait ‘til after...

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Traitor

By on Oct 30, 2020 in Fiction | Comments Off

We find the stranger in our ark near East Fence. Me and Ada. Not a real ark, just some old rotted logs and pine branches for a roof. We set up inside after morning prayers. Pretend to off the infected. Patrol doesn’t come by in winter – too much mud – no one crazy enough to go over the mountains, not with all that snow and ice. No one except the stranger.    Ada’s snuffling behind me, got the ear of her rag bunny stuffed inside her mouth. Sucking. Always sucking. I jam my long braid down the back of my jacket and squat near the front of the ark to get a better look. I’ve...

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Somewhere in the Night

By on Oct 18, 2020 in Fiction | Comments Off

Middle Georgia—Summer 1974 He had forgotten how long he had been traveling—or how far. It had all seemed a lot clearer back then when he first decided to come to see her, again. All that was involved was flying into Atlanta and then taking the bus down to Flat Rock—just a few hours at most. But somehow, somewhere along the line, everything changed. Maybe it changed after he heard her voice; as if everything up until that time had been little more than a lark, an escape—not from boredom, but from the burden of routine repetition—or maybe it was just because of simple curiosity. He...

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Those Unheard Are Sweeter

By on Oct 18, 2020 in Fiction | Comments Off

“Where do you go?” The question echoes in my mind as if sounding through a cavern. It’s annoying as an alarm clock. If I could only swat a snooze button and silence the interruption. “Dear,” my wife says with fading patience, “the Millers drove all this way to meet us, and you’re ignoring them.” I snap out of it and recognize Bailey’s Tabard Inn, the restaurant that my wife, Barbara, and I frequent. At the table sits another couple, Alison and Geoffrey Miller. I work with Geoff at the university. In fact, we share an office because we’re literature professors. He...

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